Category: Films

  • Frida (2002)

    Frida (2002)

    This biopic of the famous Mexican surrealist painter Frida Kahlo (portrayed by Salma Hayek) exists on this blog for its positive portrayal of Kahlo’s fluid sexuality. While Kahlo’s bisexuality is not necessarily centered in the storytelling, for a film released in 2002, it is pleasantly free of homophobia and looks at Kahlo’s life with an unjudgmental eye.

  • Crush (2022)

    Crush (2022)

    This may be the most unproblematic queer romance I’ve ever seen. High school student Paige Evans (Rowan Blanchard) teams up with fellow track teammate AJ Campos (Auli’i Cravalho) in order to apprehend the graffiti artist who threatens to get Paige expelled unless she can prove she’s not the done tagging the school.

  • Ammonite (2020)

    Ammonite (2020)

    I have come to associate Kate Winslet with tragedy. It’s kind of a chicken-and-the-egg situation: I’m not sure if my love of tragedy preceded my love for this English actress, or if my love of Winslet made me necessarily drawn to tragedies. Then I remember I discovered her smack in the middle of the biggest romantic tragedy of the ’90s (ahem, Titanic).

  • The World to Come (2020)

    The World to Come (2020)

    After the brutality of Tell It to the Bees, I scrambled to find a softer, lighter film. A brief review “for parents” informed me of all the same content warnings I offered you above, and although domestic assault and animal slaughter are in no way “soft” or “light,” I was intrigued by the idea of two desolate, overworked, and underappreciated women finding solace in each other. So I took the plunge.

  • Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019)

    Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019)

    For a film where they don’t end up together because of historical circumstance, I got an immense amount of joy from this film. It’s soft, and it’s safe, and there is absolutely no homophobia. Refreshing!

  • Tell It to the Bees (2019)

    Tell It to the Bees (2019)

    I adored this movie’s portrayal of Sapphic love between Jean Markham (Anna Paquin) and Lydia Weekes (Holliday Grainger). I loved how innocent and easy this relationship was from the start, especially how Lydia had absolutely no qualms about her new feelings toward a woman despite the prejudice against homosexuality in post-World War II Scotland.