Tag: lesbian

  • In the Event of Love (2022)

    In the Event of Love (2022)

    Debut author Courtney Kae’s In the Event of Love (2022)–the first installment of their Fern Fall series–is the feel-good, incredibly safe sapphic Christmas romance we’ve been waiting for from Hallmark and Lifetime (which neither of them have yet to deliver). I am the biggest sucker in the world for a story of best friends to lovers, and an even bigger sucker for stories where the euphoria of finally getting together is amplified by the years that have passed since their initial romance. Kae delivers both in their novel!

  • Dead to Me (2019-2022)

    Dead to Me (2019-2022)

    This heartbreaking/heartwarming story about an uptight, borderline alcoholic real estate agent Jen Harding (Christina Applegate) and tender-hearted artist Judy Hale (Linda Cardellini), who are brought together by grief and (forced) circumstance, had me hooked from the very first episode. The complicated and intense relationship that these characters form is a rare bird (and I don’t mean the one Jen Harding uses to murder Judy’s ex, Steve Wood [James Marsden]).

  • The Haunting of Bly Manor (2020)

    The Haunting of Bly Manor (2020)

    My wife and I first watched The Haunting of Bly Manor in 2020 because I was looking for a solid way to review Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw (1898) before my PhD general exams, and I heard it was a fairly faithful adaptation of the most-widely-adapted ghost story to ever be written in English. That, and we’d heard it was sapphic, which is always enough to get me to want to watch/read something.

  • Honey Girl (2021)

    Honey Girl (2021)

    I’ll start this review by saying that the pain inflicted by Honey Girl is not related to the queer experience. Rather, it is a uniquely millennial and a uniquely POC pain that Morgan Rogers articulates in her debut novel.

  • A League of Their Own (2022-)

    A League of Their Own (2022-)

    When a major candy company decides to fill not only America’s bellies but the gap in sports entertainment left by the droves of men drafted for World War II, they recruit 60 women to begin a women’s professional baseball league.

  • The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School (2022)

    The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School (2022)

    Sonora Reyes had me at Catholic School. Well, let’s be real–she had me at Lesbiana. I’m finally at the point where discussions of homosexuality and Christianity no longer make my eyes twitch and my body convulse, so I’m aware that the pain score I’ve assigned might not be harsh enough. However, Reyes really has found a way to take the sting out of many of the well-rehearsed homosexuality v. Christianity debates she reproduces for this brilliant book (mainly because of how foolish those arguments look in the light of reason).

  • Frida (2002)

    Frida (2002)

    This biopic of the famous Mexican surrealist painter Frida Kahlo (portrayed by Salma Hayek) exists on this blog for its positive portrayal of Kahlo’s fluid sexuality. While Kahlo’s bisexuality is not necessarily centered in the storytelling, for a film released in 2002, it is pleasantly free of homophobia and looks at Kahlo’s life with an unjudgmental eye.

  • Pepper’s Penance (2021)

    Pepper’s Penance (2021)

    Pepper’s Penance landed in my lap this past winter when I’d reached out to Twitter’s writing community looking for books on musicians. Davina Lee had promised me a happy(ish) Sapphic love story, and so I was more than willing to take the plunge.

  • Crush (2022)

    Crush (2022)

    This may be the most unproblematic queer romance I’ve ever seen. High school student Paige Evans (Rowan Blanchard) teams up with fellow track teammate AJ Campos (Auli’i Cravalho) in order to apprehend the graffiti artist who threatens to get Paige expelled unless she can prove she’s not the done tagging the school.

  • Women (2014)

    Women (2014)

    “(We are, both of us, probably, addicted to anguish. Perhaps this is our bonding attribute: Our penchant for anguish and longing and the solitude that is required of both.)”

    Introduction to Women, Elizabeth Ellen

    I’m hesitant to write this review. It’s not because I’m one of those readers who accused Caldwell of sexual tourism (though even I, with eyes as wide open as I can try to get them to be, am programmed to mistrust narratives like these that depict “straight” women exploring homosexuality only to return to heterosexuality by the end of the narrative).