Tag: Novel

  • The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School (2022)

    The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School (2022)

    Sonora Reyes had me at Catholic School. Well, let’s be real–she had me at Lesbiana. I’m finally at the point where discussions of homosexuality and Christianity no longer make my eyes twitch and my body convulse, so I’m aware that the pain score I’ve assigned might not be harsh enough. However, Reyes really has found a way to take the sting out of many of the well-rehearsed homosexuality v. Christianity debates she reproduces for this brilliant book (mainly because of how foolish those arguments look in the light of reason).

  • Pepper’s Penance (2021)

    Pepper’s Penance (2021)

    Pepper’s Penance landed in my lap this past winter when I’d reached out to Twitter’s writing community looking for books on musicians. Davina Lee had promised me a happy(ish) Sapphic love story, and so I was more than willing to take the plunge.

  • Women (2014)

    Women (2014)

    “(We are, both of us, probably, addicted to anguish. Perhaps this is our bonding attribute: Our penchant for anguish and longing and the solitude that is required of both.)”

    Introduction to Women, Elizabeth Ellen

    I’m hesitant to write this review. It’s not because I’m one of those readers who accused Caldwell of sexual tourism (though even I, with eyes as wide open as I can try to get them to be, am programmed to mistrust narratives like these that depict “straight” women exploring homosexuality only to return to heterosexuality by the end of the narrative).

  • The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo (2017)

    The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo (2017)

    This book is deceptive–with a title like The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, one does not expect Evelyn Hugo’s true love to be a woman. In fact I didn’t pick it up for years because I assumed the titular character to be straight. And what a lovely treat this novel was once I discovered this not to be the case (well, only for a little while).

  • Undergrounder (2022)

    Undergrounder (2022)

    As someone who, as a rule, shies away from fantasy, I absolutely adored Undergrounder. Perhaps this is because it is a lesbian retelling of a “tale as old as time.” Perhaps it’s because of J.E. Glass’ sharp wit. Or perhaps it’s because it’s powerfully feminist—the real monsters are not the beings with fangs and claws but HUMANS…often men.