Tag: Save Sappho

  • Delilah Green Doesn’t Care (2022)

    Delilah Green Doesn’t Care (2022)

    This was the most refreshing read because it was the first piece of Sapphic content that I’ve ever encountered that had a happy ending without any grossly traumatic bits in between.

    Before I move onto the spoiler-y part of my review, I will say that you can rest assured that this is a safe read with a happy ending. I highly recommend this book, especially for those of you who are really dying for a Sapphic happily-ever-after.

  • The World to Come (2020)

    The World to Come (2020)

    After the brutality of Tell It to the Bees, I scrambled to find a softer, lighter film. A brief review “for parents” informed me of all the same content warnings I offered you above, and although domestic assault and animal slaughter are in no way “soft” or “light,” I was intrigued by the idea of two desolate, overworked, and underappreciated women finding solace in each other. So I took the plunge.

  • The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo (2017)

    The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo (2017)

    This book is deceptive–with a title like The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, one does not expect Evelyn Hugo’s true love to be a woman. In fact I didn’t pick it up for years because I assumed the titular character to be straight. And what a lovely treat this novel was once I discovered this not to be the case (well, only for a little while).

  • Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019)

    Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019)

    For a film where they don’t end up together because of historical circumstance, I got an immense amount of joy from this film. It’s soft, and it’s safe, and there is absolutely no homophobia. Refreshing!

  • Undergrounder (2022)

    Undergrounder (2022)

    As someone who, as a rule, shies away from fantasy, I absolutely adored Undergrounder. Perhaps this is because it is a lesbian retelling of a “tale as old as time.” Perhaps it’s because of J.E. Glass’ sharp wit. Or perhaps it’s because it’s powerfully feminist—the real monsters are not the beings with fangs and claws but HUMANS…often men.

  • Tell It to the Bees (2019)

    Tell It to the Bees (2019)

    I adored this movie’s portrayal of Sapphic love between Jean Markham (Anna Paquin) and Lydia Weekes (Holliday Grainger). I loved how innocent and easy this relationship was from the start, especially how Lydia had absolutely no qualms about her new feelings toward a woman despite the prejudice against homosexuality in post-World War II Scotland.